Monthly Archives: June 2013

Second marriages: pre-nuptial and post-nuptial agreements

By Sally Wagley, Maine elder law and estate attorney

Some clients who marry later in life do not think, before the wedding, about the usefulness of a prenuptial agreement. In the flush of romance, these clients may not have their minds on practical matters, such as ensuring that their assets will remain separate should they divorce and ensuring that children from previous marriages will inherit.

After the wedding, when things calm down, these clients may turn their attention to these sobering issues. They may, at that point, wish they had executed a prenuptial agreement. Is it too late for these clients to execute an agreement of this kind?

No, it is not too late for these clients. Post-nuptial agreements under which each member of the couple agrees to forego certain spousal rights in the event of divorce or upon death. In this situation, each one will need to see advice from his/her own lawyer, as a single lawyer would face a conflict of interest in representing them both. Also, each one has to make full disclosure to the other of all financial assets that each has, so that there are no secrets between them in this regard.

Second marriages: the “elective share,” your spouse’s right to part of your estate when you die.

The law in Maine is such that, absent an agreement to the contrary, a married person cannot disinherit his or her surviving spouse. The law gives the surviving spouse the right to go to court to demand that he or she receive at least one-third of the deceased’s “augmented estate.” The determination of the amount that the surviving spouse can receive takes into account not only the assets in the deceased spouse’s name but also some of the surviving spouse’s assets.

We have many clients who marry later in life, sometimes for the second time. Each spouse has accumulated assets separately and may have children from a previous marriage. One or both spouses may wish to favor his or her own children in the will, choosing not to leave anything to the surviving spouse or perhaps to leave only a modest amount. For those clients who die without being aware or without addressing the “elective share” issue, the deceased’s children may be in for an unpleasant surprise, should the surviving spouse choose to seek more from the estate than what was left to him or her in the deceased’s will.

Clients who are either planning to marry or who are already married, who wish to agree that neither will file for the elective share against the other’s estate can put this in writing in a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement.

Second marriages: giving your surviving spouse a life estate in your home

By Sally Wagley, Maine elder law and estate attorney

Consider the case of this typical client of ours, a man in his 60’s, married for the second time to a lovely woman, also in her 60’s. He has three grown children from his previous marriage and several grandchildren. She too has children and grandchildren of her own. Both have property, savings and investments of their own, which they wish to keep separate, and which they wish to leave directly to their own children rather than to each other.

When they marry, the wife moves into the husband’s home. The husband chooses to keep the home titled in his own name, rather than put his wife’s name on the deed, so that the home will ultimately go to his children when he dies. At the same time, he does not want his wife to have to move out of the home when he dies. He comes to us for advice.

One of the options we offer him is revising his will so as to provide his wife with a “life estate” in the home. The will we prepare for him states that should his wife survive him, she has the right to occupy the home for as long as she wants, provided she pays the expenses (taxes, insurance, utilities, maintenance) and takes care of the home. Should she choose to move out of the home, the property will then belong to his children, who can do with it as they choose. If she remains there until she dies, then upon her death the husband’s children will at that point receive title to the home.

In this way, the husband can ensure that his wife will not be uprooted while at the same time ensuring that his children will inherit the property when she no longer needs it.

Legal Issues Facing People in Second Marriages

By Sally Wagley, Maine elder law and estate attorney

In the next couple of weeks, we will be blogging on some of the legal issues facing older people who are in second marriages. As Maine elder law and estate planning attorneys, we have many clients in this situation. Many of them have children from previous marriages and want to balance the needs of those children with the needs of a surviving spouse.

Some of the legal vehicles for ensuring this balance are: prenuptial and postnuptial agreements; leaving the surviving spouse a life estate in the home; marital and family trusts; a special needs trust for a spouse who is likely to need expensive long term care.

We hope you will find this information useful and we will be glad to advise you if you are in a second marriage.

Change in Medicare’s “substantial improvement” standard

By Patrice A. Putman, Maine estate and elder law attorney

Aging is never easy and many people experience a short hospitalization followed by a longer stay in a skilled nursing facility. Eldery people in Maine and elsewhere have generally understood that their hospitalization will be covered by Medicare and that Medicare can cover skilled nursing care for up to 100 days. After 100 days, continued care is considered “long-term” or “custodial” care which Medicare does not pay for.

Up until the fall of 2012, Medicare had a practice of only paying for a skilled nursing facility so long as the patient continued to make “significant improvement”. If the patient was no longer making significant improvement, Medicare’s practice was to stop paying, even if this was well before the 100 day allowance. Last fall, this practice of terminating coverage based on the “substantial improvement” standard ended. Now, the new standard for continued Medicare coverage is a whether the patient needs skilled care — even if it would simply maintain the patient’s current condition or slow further deterioration. The stated standard is “The skilled services must be reasonable and necessary for the diagnosis or treatment of your condition.” The care must also be ordered by a physician. This is a big and positive change to a long-standing practice. Medicare is now covering some patients that it was not covering just six months ago.

If you or a loved one is denied Medicare coverage for skilled nursing care in Maine, it may be helpful to meet with us. We are Maine elder law attorneys (referred to sometimes as “elder lawyers” or “elder care attorneys”). We would review the situation to determine whether you are entitled to continue coverage and then help you resolve this with Medicare.

The information provided in this post is for educational purposes only. It describes the law in effect at the time the materials were written. This information should not be construed as rendering legal advice or offering an answer to a specific legal problem.

Special Needs Trusts Can Be Structured Several Ways

By Sally M. Wagley, Maine elder law attorney

A special needs trust can be a valuable tool in protecting the long term well-being of a loved one. Here are some common questions answered about various structures.

What is a “third party” special needs trust?
A third party special needs trust is for the client who wants to provide in his or her will for a disabled child or other relative. The client’s goal is to ensure that the disabled child or relative continues to be eligible for SSI, MaineCare and other public assistance programs while having funds available on the side to meet his or her special needs. The client has a Will which appoints a trustee to handle the disabled child’s or relative’s inheritance. Typically, the trust will say that if anything remains in the trust when the disabled child or relative dies, the balance will then be distributed to certain other family members. (A third party special needs trust is not required to have a “pay-back” provision to reimburse the government.)

What is a “first party” special needs trust?
A first party special needs trust is for the disabled client on public assistance who receives a sum of money; for example, from a personal injury or medical malpractice action, from an inheritance or from a divorce. If the client places the new funds in a “first party” special needs trust which meets certain strict requirements, the client will continue to be eligible for SSI, MaineCare and other public assistance programs. The requirements are: the person must be disabled according to the standards used by the Social Security Administration; the person must be under age 65; the trust must be irrevocable; it must be established by a parent, grandparent, guardian or court; it must state that any funds remaining in the trust at the disabled person’s death be used to pay back the government for what it spent on the person’s medical care. Anyone can be named trustee of a special needs trust of this type: a friend, family member, professional, bank, trust company or non-profit organization.

What is a “pooled” trust?

A pooled trust is a special needs trust administered by a non-profit organization for the benefit of a number of disabled people. The disabled person’s funds are placed in a “sub-account” with the organization. The organization acts as trustee for the disabled person, drawing on the person’s sub-account to make direct payments to providers for the person’s special needs. In Maine, there are two pooled trusts: the Maine Pooled Disability Trust and the Maine Trust for People with Disabilities. Under SSI and MaineCare rules, if a person age 65 or older wants to fund a special needs trust, he or she must use the pooled trust.