Category Archives: Elder law

Medicare coverage when you are in a foreign country

By Sally M. Wagley, Maine elder law attorney

Many retirees look forward to travel, including international travel. But don’t assume that Medicare or your Medicare supplement policy will cover your care in another country, without the purchase of additional insurance.

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Medicare has extremely limited coverage for international travel, even if there is an emergency. Here’s what you need to know:

1. Medicare Part A will not cover care outside the US unless: a) the nearest hospital is in a foreign country rather than in the U.S. (e.g. Canada or Mexico) or 2) you are traveling through Canada to or from Alaska by the most direct route.
2. Medicare Part B will only cover services outside the U.S. if you are on board a ship which is less than six hours away from a U.S. port and within territorial waters adjoining U.S. land.
3. Some Medicare supplement plans and Medicare Advantage plans may cover care while you are traveling outside the U.S. – check your policy –but probably only during the first month or two of your trip.
4. Consider purchasing additional coverage through policies available from private companies. The U.S. Department of State has information on this at http://tinyurl.com/elr-insurance-abroad

Note: Medicare does cover care in U.S. territories such as Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands.

Under no circumstances will Medicare pay for your care if you are living in a foreign country. Consider the following:

1. If the country has a strong national health plan, you pay be able to pay into the plan and receive coverage.
2. Look into “expatriate” health insurance plans available from private companies.
3. If you are moving to a place which is remote or has poor local health care, look into evacuation coverage.
4. Make sure the coverage includes any preexisting conditions for which you might need care.
5. Think twice before cancelling your Medicare “B” coverage. If you later move back to the U.S., you will incur penalties and have to pay a significantly higher premium.

The information provided on this website is for informational and educational purposes only. This information should not be construed as rendering legal advice or offering an answer to a specific legal problem.

Home Care: My Mother’s Story

By Sally M. Wagley, Maine elder law attorney

My mother, pictured here as a young woman, was healthy and active for a long time. But in her mid 80’s, she developed peripheral artery disease, resulting in the amputation of her leg. grandma victory bonds 2

The silver lining in this story is that my mother continued to live independently until her death, just short of her 91st birthday. This, in spite of the dire predictions of her rehabilitation team, who insisted that Mom have 24-hour care, preferably in a facility. Mom wanted to go home and we hired 24- hour care from a local agency. But after three days the workers had little to do. Mom, thanks to years of exercise and a strong will, was able to transfer from her bed to her wheelchair without help and to fix herself simple meals.

We replaced the workers with non-medical help from another agency, Neighbors, based in Brunswick. These workers, who became like family, came in three days a week, two hours a day, to do light housekeeping and laundry and prepare lunch. In addition, an RN from another agency, CHANS, came in once or twice a week to change bandages, take vital signs and check Coumadin levels. It was also helpful that Mom lived in an apartment in senior housing, where the evening meal was served and emergency response was available. Thus, the six to ten hours a week of in-home services (at a far lower cost than institutional care) enabled my mother to remain at home.

This happy ending is not possible for many Maine seniors, who cannot pay privately for services. A recent Portland Press Herald article reported on serious underfunding of home care and long waiting lists. Government reimbursement rates have not increased since 2005. Workers receive low wages, leading to labor shortages in. This short-sighted policy is inhumane and costs the taxpayer more: an average of $558 per person per month, versus an average of $4150 for a nursing home resident.

The information provided on this website is for informational and educational purposes only. This information should not be construed as rendering legal advice or offering an answer to a specific legal problem.

Bringing suit against a Maine nursing home for negligence, abuse or neglect

By Sally M. Wagley, Maine elder law attorney

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Elders who reside in nursing homes are very vulnerable. Most are heavily dependent on others for help with their daily activities. Many are cognitively impaired and unable to speak for themselves. Nursing homes in Maine and elsewhere are often understaffed and struggle to meet the needs of their residents. As a result, residents may experience problems such as pressure ulcers (bed sores), malnourishment, dehydration, falls and elopement. This can lead to a needless suffering and even death.

The first step, when encountering abuse, neglect or negligence, is to report it to the Maine Department of Health and Human Services’ licensing division, who will promptly investigate. Another resource is Maine’s Long Term Care Ombudsman, which will advocate for you or your family member and work with the facility to correct the problems.

Increasingly, however, residents and their families are going further: seeking the assistance of Maine elder law attorneys and personal injury attorneys in bringing suit against Maine nursing homes to get money damages for the elder. These attorneys use, as a basis for the law suit, the federal and Maine nursing home laws which set standards for nursing homes.

Unlike the medical malpractice case, which usually concerns a discrete act by a health care provider, the nursing home case typically involves a pattern of inadequate care over a period of time. An attorney who is skilled in Maine nursing home cases will gather evidence by interviewing the resident (if the resident is competent), the family and the staff, and will also review the patient’s chart.

If you or a family member have been harmed as a result of inadequate care in a Maine nursing home, we will be glad to evaluate the case and partner with skilled counsel to bring a suit for damages.

The information provided on this website is for informational and educational purposes only. This information should not be construed as rendering legal advice or offering an answer to a specific legal problem.

Understanding Long Term Care Insurance

By Sally M. Wagley, Maine elder law attorney

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Have you been advised to purchase long term care (LTC) insurance? Before making such a purchase it is important to understand what such insurance will and will not cover. These are some of the things you need to know:

Nursing home-only coverage vs. coverage of assisted living and home care: Ideally, the policy should cover these different types of care. Most people prefer to be cared for someplace other than a nursing home.

Benefit “triggers”: Most policies will not start to pay out until you are very disabled, mentally or physically, and your care needs are high. These policies require that you be at the point that you need as substantial amount of help with at least three activities of daily living or be so mentally impaired that you are a danger to yourself or others.

Daily benefit rate: The policy will cover up to a certain amount per day: for example, $150, $200 or $300 per day. The higher the daily benefit rate, the more the policy will cost. Currently, nursing home care in Maine costs an average of $8000 a month, and some facilities charge as much as $10,000. Thus, your LTC insurance will likely not cover the full cost and you will need to use some of your income or savings.

Elimination period: Most policies will not start covering the cost on day one. The policy will require that you receive care for a certain number of days before it will start to pay: for example 30 to 90 days. This means that you will need to draw on your savings until the elimination period is over.

Length of benefit period: There are few if any policies these days that will cover you for your lifetime. Policies will generally cover your care for two to five years. This means that if you need care for longer than this, you will need to start paying from your savings.

Inflation protection: Long term care costs increase every year. If you decide to buy LTC insurance, you should consider opting for inflation protection so that years from now if you need care, the benefit amount will more closely match the cost.

The information provided on this website is for informational and educational purposes only. This information should not be construed as rendering legal advice or offering an answer to a specific legal problem.

Medicare patients in nursing homes CAN leave for a special event

By Sally M. Wagley, Maine elder law attorney

Are you or a family member a Medicare resident of a skilled nursing facility, perhaps rehabilitating after a hospital stay? Have you or your relative asked to leave the facility for a few hours or a day for a special event or purpose such as Christmas dinner or a short visit home? Frequently, to the great disappointment of the resident, the facility may tell the resident that if he or she leaves, even for a few hours, he or she will lose Medicare coverage.

This is not accurate. Medicare rules state: “An outside pass or short leave of absence for the purpose of attending a special religious service, holiday meal, family occasion, going on a car ride, or a trial visit home, is not, by itself evidence that the individual no longer needs to be in a skilled nursing facility for the receipt of required skilled care.” As long as the resident returns to the facility by midnight, the facility can bill Medicare for the day’s stay. Medicare rules state that it is “not appropriate” for a nursing home to tell a resident otherwise.

In short, you should feel free to talk to nursing home staff about a short visit out of the facility. The nursing home staff may have legitimate concerns about how such a trip may affect your health and safety; but should not refuse your request based on misinformation about Medicare coverage.

The information provided on this website is for informational and educational purposes only. This information should not be construed as rendering legal advice or offering an answer to a specific legal problem.

Medicare Recipients and ObamaCare

By Sally M. Wagley, Maine elder law attorney

With the launch of the government’s new health care exchanges on October 1, 2013, I have had a number of clients ask me how this will affect them as Medicare recipients. The answer is “not at all.” The exchanges are intended to serve people you don’t get Medicare: typically people who are not yet retired.

If you are on Medicare, you will continue to get your coverage the same way: You will automatically receive Medicare Part A and you will have the option of signing up for Medicare Part B by paying a premium which is automatically deducted from your Social Security check. (Some recipients opt to have a “Medicare Advantage Plan” which takes the place of Parts A and B.) You will also continue to have the option of purchasing a Medicare supplement policy and a Medicare prescription drug plan.

Beware This Very Expensive Medicare Detail

By Patrice A. Putman, Maine elder law attorney

Medicare rules and policies are always confusing but there are some rules that, over time, people tend to hear about. One of the Medicare policies that people tend to be familiar with is the one that basically says, if you have been an inpatient in the hospital for three or more days, Medicare will pay for Skilled Nursing Care for up to 100 days. This rule has recently been at the forefront of much news because of a settlement in the Jimmo v. Sebelius case. Prior to this settlement, Medicare would often deny payment for Skilled Nursing Care if the patient was not making “substantial improvement”. Now, since the Jimmo settlement, Medicare must pay for care during those 100 days if the care is needed to maintain or simply prevent deterioration in the patient’s clinical condition. Continued improvement is no longer necessary.

The Jimmo settlement is great for patient care, but there is another detail in the Medicare law that people should be keenly aware of. This has to do with those three days of “inpatient” hospital care. The unknown detail has to do with what is considered “inpatient” hospital care. For Medicare purposes, in determining what is considered an “inpatient” hospital stay, emergency room care and being in an “observation” status do not count as inpatient care. A patient can be held in “observation” status for multiple days, on a regular hospital unit, in a regular hospital bed without any clues that, for Medicare purposes, they are not considered an inpatient. Then, when that patient is later transferred to a Skilled Nursing Unit, Medicare will not cover their care. The Center for Medicare Advocacy states in its Summer 2013 Center News: “Hospitals stays that are classified as observation, no matter what types of services are provided and no matter how many days the patient remains hospitalized in a bed, are considered outpatient.”

Congress has put forward legislation that would require time spent in observation to be counted toward meeting Medicare’s three day requirement but its passage appears doubtful despite large bipartisan support and 90 co-signers, so this problem is not going away quickly.

What can you do? ASK!!! If you or a loved one has been admitted into a hospital and are likely to move to a Skilled Nursing Unit, speak to your doctor or the Nurse Manager of your hospital unit about whether you are classified as an “inpatient” or an “observation” patient. If you are told that you are an observation patient, ask your physician to review this status and explain to your doctor why it matters; they may not know. Once you know that you are considered an “inpatient”, ask that this be confirmed in your medical record. Not knowing or not speaking up can lead to a financial disaster when you assume your care at a Skilled Nursing Unit is covered (because you have been in the hospital for 3 or more days) and later find out that Medicare will not pay for that care.

The information provided here is for educational purposes only. It should not be construed as rendering legal advice or offering an answer to a specific legal problem.

Second marriages: what if your spouse requires expensive long term care?

By Sally Wagley, Maine elder law and estate attorney

We have had a number of clients, either divorced or widowed, become happily married later in life. Sadly, after a number of years of love and companionship, one of them may start to decline and need expensive care in a nursing home or assisted living facility. For purposes of discussion, we’ll assume that the husband is the one who needs institutional care, with the wife remaining at home. The wife may find out to her chagrine that she is expected to use her own assets — accumulated by her before the marriage from a lifetime of work –on her husband’s nursing home costs. She may find out that after he has depleted his own funds, he will not qualify for state assistance through Maine’s Medicaid program (called MaineCare) until she has spent down her own funds to a certain point. This causes her great anxiety, for two reasons: most important, she wants to make sure that she has enough to live comfortably for the rest of her life; in addition, she may want to be able to pass on assets to her own children.

What can a couple do in this situation? Advance planning, while both are still healthy, is the best option. If they qualify for and can afford long term care insurance, that will make it less likely that the wife will have to spend down her own savings. Another option is an irrevocable trust, whereby the wife places some of her own assets into an irrevocable trust, naming one or more of her children as trustees. She gives up control of the principal in the trust but will receive income from it. In this way, she can put some of her assets off limits for purposes of her husband’s possible future long term care expenses. In order for her to safely do this, however, she must feel reasonably confident that neither she nor her husband will need long term care in the next five years, as MaineCare has a “five-year look-back” rule which penalizes people who transfer assets in order to qualify for MaineCare.

For a couple who is already in crisis, there are still options. The spouse may purchase a certain type of annuity which meets the requirements of the law. This annuity will protect her assets while providing a stream of income. She can invest her countable assets into exempt assets, such as repairs or improvements to her home, or the purchase of a newer car.

As a last resort, some spouses choose to divorce for the purpose of preserving assets. This is a wrenching decision for most clients, but may be the only option for ensuring that the spouse at home to preserve what she has worked so hard for over the years. This divorce, however, will not prevent the wife from continuing to provide love, companionship and care to her husband, just as if they continued to be married.

Second marriages: providing for a surviving spouse in a trust

By Sally Wagley, Maine elder law and estate attorney

We have had a number of clients who fit the following profile: They are married for a second time, each with children from a previous marriage. One of them has substantially more than the other. Let’s assume for discussion purposes that the husband is the one with more than the wife. The husband wants to ensure that, should he die first, the wife has enough income to live comfortably for the rest of her life. However, he does not want to leave assets to her outright, as he wants to make sure that his children will ultimately inherit.

One option is for the husband to leave some or all of his estate to a trust for his wife’s benefit. Such a trust typically provides that she gets all the income generated by the assets placed in trust, to give her a stream of income which is adequate to maintain her standard of living. The trust may provide, in addition, that should the trust income and her own income be inadequate, the wife can receive amounts of principal which are needed for this purpose.

Who should be the trustee of this trust? One option is for the husband to name one or more of his children as trustees. If his estate is substantial, it is possible to have a bank serve as trustee. Or, if the husband trusts the wife to be a responsible trustee and to abide by the rules of the trust, he can name her to be the trustee, with one or more of his children to become the successor trustee if she becomes incapacitated.

This arrangement may be coupled with giving the wife a life estate in any real estate which he owns separately, such as a primary home or a cottage.

Second marriages: pre-nuptial and post-nuptial agreements

By Sally Wagley, Maine elder law and estate attorney

Some clients who marry later in life do not think, before the wedding, about the usefulness of a prenuptial agreement. In the flush of romance, these clients may not have their minds on practical matters, such as ensuring that their assets will remain separate should they divorce and ensuring that children from previous marriages will inherit.

After the wedding, when things calm down, these clients may turn their attention to these sobering issues. They may, at that point, wish they had executed a prenuptial agreement. Is it too late for these clients to execute an agreement of this kind?

No, it is not too late for these clients. Post-nuptial agreements under which each member of the couple agrees to forego certain spousal rights in the event of divorce or upon death. In this situation, each one will need to see advice from his/her own lawyer, as a single lawyer would face a conflict of interest in representing them both. Also, each one has to make full disclosure to the other of all financial assets that each has, so that there are no secrets between them in this regard.

Second marriages: the “elective share,” your spouse’s right to part of your estate when you die.

The law in Maine is such that, absent an agreement to the contrary, a married person cannot disinherit his or her surviving spouse. The law gives the surviving spouse the right to go to court to demand that he or she receive at least one-third of the deceased’s “augmented estate.” The determination of the amount that the surviving spouse can receive takes into account not only the assets in the deceased spouse’s name but also some of the surviving spouse’s assets.

We have many clients who marry later in life, sometimes for the second time. Each spouse has accumulated assets separately and may have children from a previous marriage. One or both spouses may wish to favor his or her own children in the will, choosing not to leave anything to the surviving spouse or perhaps to leave only a modest amount. For those clients who die without being aware or without addressing the “elective share” issue, the deceased’s children may be in for an unpleasant surprise, should the surviving spouse choose to seek more from the estate than what was left to him or her in the deceased’s will.

Clients who are either planning to marry or who are already married, who wish to agree that neither will file for the elective share against the other’s estate can put this in writing in a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement.