Bringing suit against a Maine nursing home for negligence, abuse or neglect

By Sally M. Wagley, Maine elder law attorney

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Elders who reside in nursing homes are very vulnerable. Most are heavily dependent on others for help with their daily activities. Many are cognitively impaired and unable to speak for themselves. Nursing homes in Maine and elsewhere are often understaffed and struggle to meet the needs of their residents. As a result, residents may experience problems such as pressure ulcers (bed sores), malnourishment, dehydration, falls and elopement. This can lead to a needless suffering and even death.

The first step, when encountering abuse, neglect or negligence, is to report it to the Maine Department of Health and Human Services’ licensing division, who will promptly investigate. Another resource is Maine’s Long Term Care Ombudsman, which will advocate for you or your family member and work with the facility to correct the problems.

Increasingly, however, residents and their families are going further: seeking the assistance of Maine elder law attorneys and personal injury attorneys in bringing suit against Maine nursing homes to get money damages for the elder. These attorneys use, as a basis for the law suit, the federal and Maine nursing home laws which set standards for nursing homes.

Unlike the medical malpractice case, which usually concerns a discrete act by a health care provider, the nursing home case typically involves a pattern of inadequate care over a period of time. An attorney who is skilled in Maine nursing home cases will gather evidence by interviewing the resident (if the resident is competent), the family and the staff, and will also review the patient’s chart.

If you or a family member have been harmed as a result of inadequate care in a Maine nursing home, we will be glad to evaluate the case and partner with skilled counsel to bring a suit for damages.

The information provided on this website is for informational and educational purposes only. This information should not be construed as rendering legal advice or offering an answer to a specific legal problem.