Home Care: My Mother’s Story

By Sally M. Wagley, Maine elder law attorney

My mother, pictured here as a young woman, was healthy and active for a long time. But in her mid 80’s, she developed peripheral artery disease, resulting in the amputation of her leg. grandma victory bonds 2

The silver lining in this story is that my mother continued to live independently until her death, just short of her 91st birthday. This, in spite of the dire predictions of her rehabilitation team, who insisted that Mom have 24-hour care, preferably in a facility. Mom wanted to go home and we hired 24- hour care from a local agency. But after three days the workers had little to do. Mom, thanks to years of exercise and a strong will, was able to transfer from her bed to her wheelchair without help and to fix herself simple meals.

We replaced the workers with non-medical help from another agency, Neighbors, based in Brunswick. These workers, who became like family, came in three days a week, two hours a day, to do light housekeeping and laundry and prepare lunch. In addition, an RN from another agency, CHANS, came in once or twice a week to change bandages, take vital signs and check Coumadin levels. It was also helpful that Mom lived in an apartment in senior housing, where the evening meal was served and emergency response was available. Thus, the six to ten hours a week of in-home services (at a far lower cost than institutional care) enabled my mother to remain at home.

This happy ending is not possible for many Maine seniors, who cannot pay privately for services. A recent Portland Press Herald article reported on serious underfunding of home care and long waiting lists. Government reimbursement rates have not increased since 2005. Workers receive low wages, leading to labor shortages in. This short-sighted policy is inhumane and costs the taxpayer more: an average of $558 per person per month, versus an average of $4150 for a nursing home resident.

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